Kiwi at Otanewainuku


Pistachio

Pistachio

We were very excited in 2013 when, after many non-fertile eggs, our breeding pair Maui and Whetu had a chick hatch at Kiwi Encounter. She was named Pistachio as she was such a hard nut to crack and had difficulty breaking out of her shell.

She is currently with our other juvenile chicks in the Warrenheip creche until she reaches the right weight and age to be released into Otanewainuku.

 
Dave Wills and Donna Watchman changing a transmitter battery

Kiwi Monitoring

Our volunteers spend many hours monitoring our kiwi, both our juveniles in the creche at Warrenheip and our two breeding kiwi, Maui and Whetu.

Transmitter batteries are changed on a regular basis and the kiwi are weighed and have a health check at the same time. They are feisty birds, using their strong back legs to defend themselves.


 

 

Maui and Whetu

These were our first kiwi translocated to Otanewainuku. They were part of the captive kiwi breeding project and although the eastern taxa of the North Is brown kiwi, they spent their captive lives in Willow Park in Christchurch. We monitor the male kiwi using a radio tracking device which is carefully attached to his leg. When he incubates an egg the device senses this and changes the signal it emits. We can then estimate how many days he has been sitting.

The best time to remove the egg is around a week before hatching (around day 35). We wait until dark, some distance away in silence, until he leaves the nest for an evening feed.

Eggs are carefully removed, keeping them in the same position they were in the nest (a small pencil mark is made on the egg). It is crucial that the air sack is at the top (just as it is in the nest). A level is used to make sure the transport box is kept level on it's journey. Eggs are gently wrapped in a warm sock, and placed in a padded chilly bin.

We transport the eggs to Kiwi Encounter in Rotorua for incubation and care until they reach their release weight and size, when they are released into the forest.

 

Heading here

Birds and Bats

Kiwi

Kokako

North Island Robin

Long Tailed Bat


Flora

Rimu

Totara

King Fern

Rata

Fungi

 

Invertebrates

Stick insect

Land snails

Tree weta
 

Pests

Dogs

Ferral Cats

Rats

Mice

Hedgehogs

Possums

Pigs

Deer

Goats

Stoats

Ferrets

Weasels

 

Text/HTML